County Board meeting 16 March 2009

March 20, 2009

Another meeting rolls on to the agenda

MONDAY night, and another meeting of the Cork County Board. How many is that now?

It’s as if official gatherings seem to sprout wherever one or two gather in the name of transfer applications and fixture congestion.

It’s a commonplace to pay tribute to tenacity and determination in all forms of life by saying that a nuclear holocaust would not extinguish those same elements of God’s creation.

Clearly, however, the innate desire of Leeside GAA administrators to come together is so strong that the detonation of any amount of fission-based ordnance would not stop a quorum being formed.

Radioactivity be damned; if there’s an agenda, we’ll be there.

Anyway, last night. The meeting centred on proposals regarding the composition of the committee which will appoint the county’s next long-term senior hurling manager.

That’s exactly as much background as we’re minded to give. Take it or leave it.

Those proposals were dealt with at some length at last Thursday night’s meeting, but the executive proposal was one of the early favourites in the running.

In the event it was hardly a contest and no-one was surprised when that motion romped home, gathering 72 votes out of the 113 cast.

It means that under the initiative proposed by Central Council earlier in the dispute, three independent people will be appointed by Central Council to consider and recommend a manager to the county committee for a two-year term.

The three nominees are to be “Cork GAA people” — no member of the County Committee or current player will act on the committee.

However, questions remain regarding the original document which gave rise to the proposal.

That was proposed by Christy Cooney and Pauric Duffy in an effort to resolve the dispute some weeks ago, and it didn’t confine itself to the issue of the manager.

For instance, if the executive of the Cork County Board is content to assign Central Council the power to appoint the men who will appoint the Cork senior hurling manager, what about the other proposals in the CooneyDuffy document, which would effectively remove power from the executive? Will those be implemented?

After all, precedent has been established in last night’s decision for bringing in some of those wide-ranging recommendations, which covered issues from fixture planning through to facilities maintenance.

Furthermore, exactly how Central Council will actually appoint those three persons is another issue, and last night’s meeting did not tease out the methodology which Croke Park will use to select three Cork GAA people.

Cork already have a short-term senior hurling manager, John Considine, who was appointed on an interim basis pretty snappily last Thursday night.

Unfortunately for conspiracy theorists everywhere – but specifically those triangulated between Adrigole, Newtownshandrum and Youghal, let’s say – Considine threw a spanner in the works when he indicated
yesterday that he wouldn’t be going forward for the job on a permanent basis.

Throw the duster across the blackboard, then, and we can chalk up the usual suspects.

However, if we could divest ourselves for a second of the robes of impartiality and express an opinion, we feel it’s a great pity that proposal number 4 wasn’t adopted, an
Imokilly suggestion that the incoming manager be appointed by a committee drawn from the Cork hurling winning captains of the last 25 years.

The proposal only garnered five votes, which was unfortunate. Given the week that’s in it, it’s only right to point out that one of those captains is Ireland scrum-half Tomás O’Leary, who captained the All-Ireland winning minor side of 2001.

It would have been some fun to make a call to the Ireland team hotel this week to ask Tomás if he could take some time out from the attempt on the Grand Slam and puzzle out a long-term manager for the Cork senior hurlers.

We heard last week about Cork democracy, but that would have been some blow for Cork ecumenism.

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